Paradoxology
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This paradox rests on the idea that "false" premises imply "true". So that one does not need to accept that the premises are true in order for the conclusion to be true.--MathPoet 15:46, 4 August 2007 (UTC)

"'False' premises imply 'true.'" What does this statement mean? Maybe a word was dropped: "false" premises imply "true" statements. Or was it a typo: "false" premises imply "truth."
And I further infer that your second sentence refers to those who reject a premise for any, possibly unfounded and/or misinformed, reason. The truth of the conclusion exists independently of the statement of the premises used to draw such a conclusion. I have an inkling of an idea that the tortoise used some form of invalid logic (one for which I obviously haven't learned the name) to trap Achilles. Once one starts supposing this and supposing that, it only takes about three sentences with slightly complicated and/or ambiguous wording to twist one's mind off balance. Ctaylor503 03:06, 26 August 2007 (UTC)
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